Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Is North Korea Testing Iran's Nuclear Device? - Amil Imani and James Hyde

by Amil Imani and James Hyde

Iran’s Islamic regime is intent on forcing the Apocalypse on a bewildered and unready world.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is yet another toothless U.N. body that is in for a whirlwind of frustration when it inspects Iran’s nuclear program sites. The provisions of the agreement negotiated by Secretary of State John Kerry and his team of sycophants make Neville Chamberlain’s “peace in our time” negotiations with Hitler look like a stroke of genius.

Iran’s Islamic regime is an incredibly dangerous foe. Like ISIS (or Daesh, a moniker that group loathes), Iran has an apocalyptic view of current and near-future events. But this time around, a group of believers in Shia Iran, with tremendous resources, are intent upon forcing the issue, making the conditions so dire that they leave the reluctant Saheb-ul-Zaman, the Lord of the Age, the Mahdi, their messianic myth, no choice but to appear and assume his universal reign.

Devotees drive both, the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Islamic State, to quicken the End Times apocalypse. Iranian leaders hold to a Shia brand. ISIS leaders hold to a Sunni brand. But both are obsessed by a belief that their messiah is coming. The Iran Shiites believe they must lay the groundwork for the messiah (Mahdi) to come and build their Kingdom or Imamate. ISIS isn’t really waiting. They have propelled a jihadist storm to build the Caliphate now, so that the Mahdi will come soon.

To the latter, there will be no manifestation until the world gets a front row seat to a full-blown cataclysmic event, and that’s what’s being planned now. Despite having negotiated the Iran deal to postpone Iran’s acquisition of a nuclear device, Obama and Kerry have witlessly cut a Faustian bargain with Iran, whose theocratic supreme leader, Ali Khamenei, is all too happy to lead chants of “Death to America” and “Death to Israel” in response.

We believe, based on comments made by two remarkable experts on this subject, Dr. Peter Pry of emptaskforce.org and Ambassador Hank Cooper of highfrontier.com, the latter of whom worked in the Reagan Administration, that Iran already has the bomb and is working on figuring out how to get it into a vehicle and send it our way. It will not, however deliver annihilation to any single city or cities in the conventional sense. That would be pointless, futile and suicidal. Instead, working together with North Korea, they will seek to take out our electric infrastructure and anything electronic via satellites they already have in space and others they’ll put up into space. Unlike most satellites that orbit the earth horizontally (from west to east), the Iranian and North Korean satellites orbit from south to north over the poles, often going right over the center of the U.S. It’s what they may have in those satellites that keeps us up at night. (We’ll explain in Part Two of this dissertation.) 

What is of primary interest to us in Part One is where Iran is developing its nuclear weapons technology and it’s not in the Middle East, even though that’s where they want us looking. It’s no secret that Iran and North Korea have been trading “buddies,” but there are indications that they plan to work together to develop a “Complete America Annihilation” technology. The January 6, 2016, North Korean nuclear test may be the proof of that team effort. Kim Jon Un’s farcical boast that he was testing a “small” hydrogen bomb is a red herring. To those who don’t understand the difference between a standard nuclear warhead and a hydrogen bomb, the latter is 1,000 times more powerful and what was tested seemed closer to what fell on Hiroshima than something that could take out a couple of cities.
To raise the stakes, both countries have expressed their ardent desire to destroy us. The Iranian regime has been working their way to a nuclear bomb for almost thirty years. While Iran may well have achieved its nuclear goal, testing their monster would not have been possible in Iran. It would be picked up quickly not only by military sensors, but the U.S. Geological Survey, which recorded the latest North Korean test as being equivalent to a 5.1 earthquake. While Iran is earthquake prone, we would know the difference between a nuclear test and a bona fide earthquake almost immediately. It would be far too risky to attempt in the Middle East. So, where else could they go to test? Most likely to North Korea with a gift of badly needed oil and perhaps with some money and food. In exchange, Iran would get North Korea to test their bomb for them and it may not be the first time.

This was the fourth nuclear test conducted by North Korea. We learned from the Daily Beast and other sources, that Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, head of Iran’s nuclear program, and other Iranian nuclear scientists had been present during North Korea's three previous nuclear tests in 2006, 2009, and 2013, and were likely present during the most recent test on January 6.

The Daily Beast suggests that, “In October 2012, Iran began stationing personnel at a military base in North Korea, in a mountainous area close to the Chinese border. The Iranians, from the Ministry of Defense and associated firms, reportedly are working on both missiles and nuclear weapons [there].” That would make Iran’s recent missile tests in the Middle East decoys.

By having a base in North Korea, Iran is able to escape any identification of their nuclear activities while back in Iran, and they appear to be compliant. The vicious mullahs want that $150 billion to finance not only Islamic terror, but both theirs and North Korea’s efforts to utterly destroy the U.S. in an instant.

Business Insider points to a study conducted by David Albright, a renowned nuclear physicist and founder of the Institute for Science and International Security (I.S.I.S.) at the Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins University. As he explained, North Korea has built enough physical infrastructure to greatly ramp up its (and/or Iran’s) bomb materials production.

"There's been a lot of construction of buildings, renovations, and some new structures at the [Yongbyon] site itself," Albright said. ‘Certainly the light water reactor has materialized…. What we have trouble with is figuring out what's going on inside those buildings.’

“Researchers think North Korea has upgraded facilities to produce nuclear reactor fuel, but Albright says that it isn't known where the fabrication plant for the light-water reactor is located. And it isn't known how North Korea's uranium centrifuges are configured or how efficiently they're operating.”

North Korea is a hauntingly impoverished country. With China professing objections to its nuclear testing, it’s not likely that they got the cash to build the new structures from their mentor to the north. So from whence came the money for all of these new buildings? Enter Iran. In addition, as stated above, it’s not known how many or how sophisticated North Korea’s centrifuges may be. It is known that Iran has state-of-the-art centrifuges, which it has been disassembling in accordance with the terms of the Iran deal, although those doing the work have mysteriously stopped.

Reuters reports that, “Only decommissioned centrifuges were being dismantled to begin with, of which there were about 10,000 at Natanz and Fordow, the Atomic Energy Organisation of Iran has said.”

Over the years, Iran had successfully enriched uranium to 20 percent -- weapons grade -- in those centrifuges. Nuclear experts contend that enriching to 3 to 5 percent is ideal for a power plant.

It’s quite possible that at least some of those disassembled centrifuges have been flown to North Korea. But Iran may also have shipped some other things to their bosom buddies. Reuters also reports that when the IAEA entered the Parchin facility, they didn't find what they expected to.  “Inside the building, we saw indications of recent renovation work,” the IAEA said in a report. “There was no equipment in the building.”

Inside they were expecting to find a containment vessel designed to test nuclear triggers. Could that have been shipped to Korea, too? The IAEA didn’t find it anywhere else.

So far, all four nuclear tests have been relatively “small” in terms of yield. But it’s not so much about how much yield there is that’s important here. They’ll be focusing instead on emitting protons, lots and lots of protons. We’ll explain in Part Two what they will most likely send our way, but we can tell you in advance that the United States is woefully unprepared for what may be coming, and soon.

Amil Imani and James Hyde

Source: http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2016/01/is_north_korea_testing_irans_nuclear_device_.html

Copyright - Original materials copyright (c) by the authors.

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